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Posts from the ‘Soluciones’ Category

6
Jun

QNAP RAID System Errors & How To Fix

I – Introduction;

II -How to Fix if RAID seems “In Degreed”

III -How to Fix if RAID seems “In Degreed Mode, Read Only, Failed Drive(s) x” Cases;

IV – How to Fix if RAID Becomes “Unmounted” or “Not Active”

V – “Recover” Doesnt Work, How to Fix if RAID Becomes “Unmounted” or “Not Active”

VI – Stuck at Booting / Starting Sevices, Please Wait / Cant Even Login Qnap Interface

VII – IF “config_util 1″ Command gives “Mirror of Root Failed” Eror;

VIII – How to Fix “Broken RAID” Scenario

IX – If None of These Guides Works;

..

I – Introduction;

Warning : This documents are recomended for Professional users only. If you dont know what you’r doing, you may damage your RAID which cause loosing data. Qnapsupport Taiwan works great to solve this kind of RAID corruptions easly, and My advice is directly contact with them at this kind of cases.

1 – If documetn says “Plug out HDD and Plug in” always use original RAID HDD at the same slot. Dont use new HDDs!

2 – If you can access your data after these process, backup them quickly.

3 – You can loose data on Hardware RAID devices and other NAS brands, but nearly you cant loose data on Qnap, but recovering your datas may cause time lost, so Always double backup recomended for future cases.

4 – If one of your HDD’s cause Qnap to restart itself when you plug in to NAS, Dont use that HDD to solve these kind of cases.

This document is not valid for Qnap Ts-109 / Ts-209 / Ts-409 & Sub Models.

..

II -How to Fix if RAID seems “In Degreed”

If your RAID system seems as down below, use this document. If not, Please dont try anything in this document:

In this case, RAID information seems “RAID 5 Drive 1 3″ so, your 2.th HDD is out of RAID. Just plug out broken HDD from 2.Th HDD slot, wait around 15 seconds, and Plug in new HDD with the same size.

..

III -How to Fix if RAID seems “In Degreed Mode, Read Only, Failed Drive(s) x” Cases;

If your system seems In Degraded, Failed Drive X, you probably loose more HDD than RAID tolerated, so;

1 – Take your Backup,

2 – Re-Install Qnap From Begining.

Qnap data protection features doesnt let you loose data even if your 5 HDD gives Bad sector errors in 6 HDD RAID Systems.

..

IV – How to Fix if RAID Becomes “Unmounted” or “Not Active”

If your RAID system seems as the picture down below, fallow this document. If not, Please dont try anything in this document:

1 – Update your Qnap fimware with Qnapfinder 3.7.2 or higher firmware. Just go to Disk Managment -> RAID managment. Choose your RAID and press “Recover” to fix.

If this doesnt work and “Recover” button is still avaible, just fullow these steps;

1 – While device is still working, Plug out HDD that you suspect which maybe broken, and press Recover button again.

Plug out Broken HDD, which lights Shines RED, or which HDD seems “Normal” / “Abnormal” / “Read-Write Error”

On HDD information Screen, than Press Recover. If doesnt work, Plug in HDD again, And Press Recover once Again

2 – If you plug out HDD —> then Plug it in the same slot again —> Press “Recover” Once Again and it should repair RAID;

3 – Here is log files;

4 – And RAID systems comes back with “Indegreed Mode”, so just quickly backup your datas, and Reinstall Qnap without broken HDD again.

We loose 2 HDD from RAID 5, so its impossable to fix this RAID again. Just Re-install.

..

V – “Recover” Doesnt Work, How to Fix if RAID Becomes “Unmounted” or “Not Active”

1 – Download Putty & login Qnap,

2 – Make sure the raid status is active

To understant, type :

#more /proc/mdstat

Also If you want to Stop Running Services;

# /etc/init.d/services.sh stop

Unmount the volume:

# umount /dev/md0

Stop the array:

# mdadm -S /dev/md0

Now Try This command

For RAID 5 with 4 HDD’s

mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 4 /dev/sda3 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdc3 /dev/sdd3

-l 5 : means RAID 5. If its RAID 6, try -l 6;

-n 4 means number of your HDDs, If you have 8 HDD, try –n 8

/dev/sda3 means your first HDD.

/dev/sdd3 means your 4.th HDD

Example;

If you have RAID 6 with 8 HDD, change command line with this;

mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 6 -n 8 /dev/sda3 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdc3 /dev/sdd3 /dev/sde3 /dev/sdf3 /dev/sdg3 /dev/sdh3

If one of your HDD has Hardware Error, which cause Qnap restart itself, plug out that HDD, and type “missing” command for that HDD;

Example, if your 2.th HDD is broken, use this command;

# mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 4 /dev/sda3 missing /dev/sdc3 /dev/sdd3

3 – try manually mount

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext3

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext4

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -o ro (read only)

4 – So, Result Should be Like That;

..

VI – Stuck at Booting / Starting Sevices, Please Wait / Cant Even Login Qnap Interface

Just Plug out broken HDD and restart Qnap again. This should restarts Qnap back again.

If you’r not sure which HDD is broken, Please follw this steps;

1 – Power Off the NAS.

2 – Plug out All HDDs,

3 – Start Qnap without HDDs,

4 – Qnapfinder Should find Qnap in a few minutes. Now, Plug in all HDD’s back again same slots.

5 – Download Putty from this link and login with admin / admin usernam / password;

http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgta … nload.html

6 – Type this command lines which I marked blue;

# config_util 1 -> If result of this command give “Root Failed” dont go on and contact with Qnapsupport team

# storage_boot_init 1 ->

# df -> IF dev/md9 (HDA_ROOT) seems full, please contact with Qnapsupport.

(Now, you can Reboot your device with this command. ıf you want to reset your configration, please skip this.)

# reboot

..

VII – IF “config_util 1″ Command gives “Mirror of Root Failed” Eror;

1 – Power Off the NAS.

2 – Plug out All HDDs,

3 – Start Qnap without HDDs,

4 – Qnapfinder Should find Qnap in a few minutes. Now, Plug in all HDD’s back again same slots.

5 – Download Putty from this link and login with admin / admin usernam / password;

http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgta … nload.html

6 – Type this command lines which I marked blue;

# storage_boot_init 2 -> (this time type storage_boot_init 2, not storage_boot_init 1)

This command should turn Qnap back to last “Indegreed” Mode and you should get this kind of information after this command:

7 – Download Winscp and Login Qnap. Go to ->share ->MD0_DATA folder, and backup your datas Quickly.

..

VIII – How to Fix “Broken RAID” Scenario

First, I try to fix “Recovery” method, but doesnt work. At Qnap RAID managment menu, I check All HDDs, But all of them seems good. So I Login with Putty, and type these commands;

mdadm -E /dev/sda3

mdadm -E /dev/sdb3

mdadm -E /dev/sdc3

mdadm -E /dev/sdd3

Except first HDD, other 3 HDD’s doesn have md superblock; Also I try “config_util 1” & “storage_boot_init 2” commands, but both of them gives error;

Costumer got RAID 5 (-l 5) with 4 HDD (-n 4), so ı type this command;

# mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 4 /dev/sda3 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdc3 /dev/sdd3

then mount with this command;

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext4

And works perfect.

Also here is Putty Steps;

login as: admin

admin@192.168.101.16′s password:

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sda3

/dev/sda3:

Magic : a92b4efc

Version : 00.90.00

UUID : 2d2ee77d:045a6e0f:438d81dd:575c1ff3

Creation Time : Wed Jun 6 20:11:14 2012

Raid Level : raid5

Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)

Array Size : 5855836800 (5584.56 GiB 5996.38 GB)

Raid Devices : 4

Total Devices : 4

Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Fri Jan 11 10:24:40 2013

State : clean

Active Devices : 4

Working Devices : 4

Failed Devices : 0

Spare Devices : 0

Checksum : 8b330731 – correct

Events : 0.4065365

Layout : left-symmetric

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State

this 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3

1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3

2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3

3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdb3

mdadm: No md superblock detected on /dev/sdb3.

[~] # mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 4 /dev/sda3 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdc3 /dev/sdd3

mdadm: /dev/sda3 appears to contain an ext2fs file system

size=1560869504K mtime=Fri Jan 11 10:22:54 2013

mdadm: /dev/sda3 appears to be part of a raid array:

level=raid5 devices=4 ctime=Wed Jun 6 20:11:14 2012

mdadm: /dev/sdd3 appears to contain an ext2fs file system

size=1292434048K mtime=Fri Jan 11 10:22:54 2013

mdadm: array /dev/md0 started.

[~] # more /proc/mdstat

Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath]

md0 : active raid5 sdd3[3] sdc3[2] sdb3[1] sda3[0]

5855836800 blocks level 5, 64k chunk, algorithm 2 [4/4] [UUUU]

md4 : active raid1 sda2[2](S) sdd2[0] sdc2[3](S) sdb2[1]

530048 blocks [2/2] [UU]

md13 : active raid1 sda4[0] sdc4[3] sdd4[2] sdb4[1]

458880 blocks [4/4] [UUUU]

bitmap: 0/57 pages [0KB], 4KB chunk

md9 : active raid1 sda1[0] sdc1[3] sdd1[2] sdb1[1]

530048 blocks [4/4] [UUUU]

bitmap: 1/65 pages [4KB], 4KB chunk

unused devices:

[~] # mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext4

[~] #

Here is Result;

..

IX – If None of These Guides Works;

For rarely, I cant solve these kind of problems on Qnap. and sometimes I plug HDD’s to another Qnap to solve these kind of problems.

User different Qnap which has different hardware to solve this kind of cases!;

When you plug HDD, and restart device, Qnap will ask you to to Migrate or Reinstall Qnap, choose “Migrate” Option.

In this case, Qnap coulnt boot at Ts-659 Pro, putty commands doesnt work and we cant even enter Qnap admin interface;

How To Fix HDD Based Problems With Another Qnap

HDD’s couldnt boot from Ts-659 Pro, but after installing different device (At this case, I plug them to Ts-509 Pro) device boots fine. But of course you must use 6 or more HDD supported Qnap to save your datas.

So, If evertything fails, Just try these process with another Qnap.

Obtained from this link

6
Jun

Hot-swapping the hard drives when the RAID crashes

“No server downtime when you need to replace the RAID drives”

Contents

Procedure of hot-swapping the hard drives when the RAID crashes

RAID 5 disk mirroring provides highly secure data protection. You can use two hard drives of the same capacity to create a RAID 5 array. The RAID 5 creates an exact copy of data on the member drives. RAID 5 protects data against single drive failure. The usable capacity of RAID 5 is the capacity of the smallest member drive. It is particularly suitable for personal or company use for important data saving.

Logical volume status when the RAID operates normally

When the RAID volume operates normally, the volume status is shown as Ready under ‘Disk Management’ > ‘Volume Management’ section.

When the RAID operates normally

When a drive fails, follow the steps below to check the drive status:

When RAID volume operates normally, the volume status is shown as Ready in the Current Disk Volume Configuration section.

  • The server beeps for 1.5 sec twice when the drive fails.
  • The Status LED flashes red continuously.
  • Check the Current Disk Volume Configuration section. The volume status is In degraded mode.

When RAID crashes

You can check the error and warning messages for drive failure and disk volume in degraded mode respectively in the Event Logs.

Log information for the drive plug out event

Note: You can send and receive alert e-mail by configuring the alert notification. For the settings, please refer to the System Settings/ Alert Notification section in the user manual.

Install a new drive to rebuild RAID 5 by hot swapping

Please follow the steps below to hot swap the failed hard drive:

  • Prepare a new hard drive to rebuild RAID 5. The capacity of the new drive should be at least the same as that of the failed drive.
  • Insert the drive to the drive slot of the server. The server beeps for 1.5 seconds twice. The Status LED flashes red and green alternatively.
  • Check the Current Disk Volume Configuration section. The volume status is Rebuilding and the progress is shown.

Log information for the drive plug out event

  • When the rebuilding is completed, the Status LED lights in green and the volume status is Ready. RAID 5 mirroring protection is now active.
  • You can check the disk volume information in the Event Logs.

Log information for the drive plug in and RAID rebuilding event

Note: Do not install the new drive when the system is not yet in degraded mode to avoid unexpected system failure.

Obtained from this link

6
Jun

Stuct At Booting When HDD’s Are Not Plugged In

If you cannot access the NAS after Step 3, please do the following:

  1. Turn off the NAS.
  2. Take out all the hard disk drives.
  3. Restart the NAS.

You will hear a beep after pressing the power button, followed by 2 beeps 2 minutes later. If you cannot hear first beep, Please contact your local reseller or distributor for repair or replacement service.

If you cannot Hear the two beeps, and Qnapfinder couldnt find your NAS, the NAS Firmware is Damaged. To fix this problem, please follow “Qnap firmware Recovery / Reflash” Documents for your device model.

If you couldnt solve problem by yourself, Please contact your local reseller or distributor for repair or replacement service

If Qnapfinder can find Qnap, fallow these steps;

1 – Download Putty software;

http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/download.html

2 – Plug in all of your HDD’s with right order while device is still working. Dont restart Qnap yet. Check if all HDD’s are allright and recognized by Qnap. If any of HDD doesnt recovnized or size seems “0″, plug out that HDD.

3 –Log with putty by entering the Qnap IP / user name / password. (Username / Password: admin / admin. Port need to enter 22.)

Now enter these command down below; (Choose command from this screen and “copy” Then go to putty, just pr “pess right mouse button once. By this way, you can paste commands automaticly)

# config_util 1 -> (it must say “mirror of root succeed”. if it gives “mirror of root failed” error, stop this step and request help from Qnapsupport.)

# storage_boot_init 1

# df

If dev/md9 (HDA_ROOT) appears full, please contact QNAP support team

# reboot

Now Qnap should reboot well. If you can reach Qnap interface after restart, check RAID system, and change broken HDD with a new one.

Obtained from this link

5
Jun

QNAP TS-212 How to rebuild RAID manually from telnet

Scenario = replace a disk in QNAP TS-212 with RAID 1 configuration active

RAID rebuild should start automatically, but some times it could happen you got stuck with 1 Single Disk + 1 Mirroring Disk Volume:

SingleDisk

According to the QNAP Support – How can I migrate from Single Disk to RAID 0/1 in TS-210/TS-212? , TS-210/TS-212 does not support Online RAID Level Migration. Therefore, please backup the data on the single disk to another location, install the second hard drive, and then recreate the new RAID 0/1 array (hard drive must be formatted).

The workaround is this:

  1. Telnet to NAS as Admin
  2. Check your current disk configuration for Disk #1 and Disk #2 =
    fdisk -l /dev/sda
    Disk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
    /dev/sdb2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
    /dev/sdb3 133 121538 975193693 83 Linux
    /dev/sdb4 121539 121600 498012 83 Linux

    fdisk -l /dev/sdb

    Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
    /dev/sda3 133 121538 975193693 83 Linux
    /dev/sda4 121539 121600 498012 83 Linux

  3. SDA is the first disk, SDB is the second disk
  4. Verify the current status of RAID with this command =
    mdadm –detail /dev/md0
    /dev/md0:
    Version : 00.90.03
    Creation Time : Thu Sep 22 21:50:34 2011
    Raid Level : raid1
    Array Size : 486817600 (464.27 GiB 498.50 GB)
    Used Dev Size : 486817600 (464.27 GiB 498.50 GB)
    Raid Devices : 2
    Total Devices : 1
    Preferred Minor : 0
    Persistence : Superblock is persistent

    Intent Bitmap : Internal

    Update Time : Thu Jul 19 01:13:58 2012
    State : active, degraded
    Active Devices : 1
    Working Devices : 1
    Failed Devices : 0
    Spare Devices : 0

    UUID : 72cc06ac:570e3bf8:427adef1:e13f1b03
    Events : 0.1879365

    Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
    0 0 0 0 removed
    1 8 3 1 active sync /dev/sda3

  5. As you can see the /dev/sda3 is working, so disk #1 is OK, but disk #2 is missing from RAID
  6. Check if Disk #2 /dev/sdb is mounted (it should be) =
    mount/proc on /proc type proc (rw)
    none on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,gid=5,mode=620)
    sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw)
    tmpfs on /tmp type tmpfs (rw,size=32M)
    none on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw)
    /dev/sda4 on /mnt/ext type ext3 (rw)
    /dev/md9 on /mnt/HDA_ROOT type ext3 (rw)
    /dev/md0 on /share/MD0_DATA type ext4 (rw,usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv0,user_xattr,data=ordered,delalloc,noacl)
    tmpfs on /var/syslog_maildir type tmpfs (rw,size=8M)
    /dev/sdt1 on /share/external/sdt1 type ufsd (rw,iocharset=utf8,dmask=0000,fmask=0111,force)
    tmpfs on /.eaccelerator.tmp type tmpfs (rw,size=32M)
    /dev/sdb3 on /share/HDB_DATA type ext3 (rw,usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv0,user_xattr,data=ordered,noacl)


     

  7. Dismount the /dev/sdb3 Disk #2 with this command =
    umount /dev/sdb3
  8. Add Disk #2 into the RAID /dev/md0 =
    mdadm /dev/md0 –add /dev/sdb3
    mdadm: added /dev/sdb3
  9. Check the RAID status and the rebuild should be started automatically =
    mdadm –detail /dev/md0
    /dev/md0:
    Version : 00.90.03
    Creation Time : Thu Sep 22 21:50:34 2011
    Raid Level : raid1
    Array Size : 486817600 (464.27 GiB 498.50 GB)
    Used Dev Size : 486817600 (464.27 GiB 498.50 GB)
    Raid Devices : 2
    Total Devices : 2
    Preferred Minor : 0
    Persistence : Superblock is persistent

    Intent Bitmap : Internal

    Update Time : Thu Jul 19 01:30:27 2012
    State : active, degraded, recovering
    Active Devices : 1
    Working Devices : 2
    Failed Devices : 0
    Spare Devices : 1

    Rebuild Status : 0% complete

    UUID : 72cc06ac:570e3bf8:427adef1:e13f1b03
    Events : 0.1879848

    Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
    2 8 19 0 spare rebuilding /dev/sdb3
    1 8 3 1 active sync /dev/sda3

  10. Check the NAS site for the rebuild % progressimage
  11. After the RAID rebuild complete, restart NAS to clean all previous mount point folder for sdb3

Obtained from this link

5
Jun

How To Troubleshoot a Broken RAID Volume On a QNAP Storage Device

Something like four weeks ago I had a major issue with my QNAP TS-459 Pro storage device. I did a simple firmware upgrade and whoop my RAID0 volume was gone, oops!

So I was left with three stand alone disks as shown on the screenshot above. The two WDC VelociRaptor disks were supposed to form a single RAID0 volume, well it used to be just before the firmware upgrade…

As an old saying goes, if your data is important backup once, if your data is critical backup twice. My data is important and I had everything rsync’ed on another QNAP TS-639 Pro storage device but still it is pain in the a***. By the way did you know that with the latest beta firmware, your QNAP device can copy your data to a SaaS (Storage as a Service) provider in the Cloud, cool isn’t it :)

It took me some time to recover my broken RAID0 volume and many trial and errors. Hopefully I had a backup and a lot of spare time thus I could play around with the device. Fist thing I tried is a restore of the latest known working backup of my QNAP storage device. The restore process went flawlessly but upon reboot, I had the same problem, my RAID0 volume was still gone.

I SSH’ed in the QNAP device and triggered some mdadm commands as shown on the screenshot below.

mdadm -E /dev/md0 confirmed the issue, no RAID0 volume even though I did a restore of the QNAP’s configuration settings.

Whilst mdadm -E /dev/sda3 showed me that a superblock was available for /dev/sda3, that wasn’t the case for /dev/sdb3. That’s not good at all :(

/proc/mdstat confirmed that the restore was useless, no /dev/md0 declared in that configuration file…

Well the restore was partially helpful. Look at the screenshots above, in the logical volumes panel, you see that a stripping volume containing disk 1 and 2 was declared but not active. And on the second screenshot, the striping disk volume was unmounted as a result.

I tried to re-build the stripping configuration with the command: mdadm –build c 64 -l 0 -n 2 /dev/md0 /dev/sda3 /dev/sdb3 and /dev/md0 was successfully appended to /proc/mdstat

 

I tried a mount /dev/md0 but that did not work out. I checked /etc/mtab for /dev/md0 but could not find it. It was not exported as I would expect… At this stage I decided that a reboot was necessary…

The device was back up and I checked in the Volume Management panel for the status of the striping volume and it was still not active but this time the File System column showed EXT3. The Check Now button might help to recover the striping volume to a healthy state, let’s try that and indeed it was a success as shown on the two screenshots below. The Check Now button fixed the /dev/md0 entry in /etc/mtab and the status was now as active. Hurray!

Unfortunately the happiness was short because as soon the QNAP device rebooted, the striping volume configuration settings were gone. Actually I could see that the superblock, that is the portion of the disks part of a RAID set, where the parameters that define a software RAID volume, was not persistent, that is was not written in a superblock as shown in the screenshot below.

I had to face it, I would not be able to recover my striping disk volume thus I decided that it was time to re-create it from scratch and copy back my data. So I cleared any RAID volume settings from the device and while at it, I decided to evaluate the sweet spot of the chunk size especially for a RAID0 volume.

That reminds me that even if technology is getting better and better, still it is not error free and shit happens. Hopefully no data was lost for good and I could get my home lab back up with an even faster RAID0 volume as before the crash, thanks to the new chunk size

Obtained from this link

5
Jun

QNAP comandos útiles con ejemplos

more /proc/mdstat

fdisk -l

mdadm -E /dev/sda3

mdadm -E /dev/sdb3

mdadm -E /dev/sdc3

mdadm -E /dev/sdd3

Para 8 discos seguimos con mdadm -E /dev/sde3 , mdadm -E /dev/sdf3 , mdadm -E /dev/sd3 , mdadm -E /dev/sdh3 , y si son más, seguimos.

mdadm -D /dev/md0

cat /etc/raidtab

Ejemplos:

Con problemas, el raid 5 de 4 discos no aparece

[~] # more /proc/mdstat
Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath]
md4 : active raid1 sdd2[2](S) sdc2[1] sda2[0]
530048 blocks [2/2] [UU]

md13 : active raid1 sda4[0] sdd4[2] sdc4[1]
458880 blocks [4/3] [UUU_]
bitmap: 40/57 pages [160KB], 4KB chunk

md9 : active raid1 sda1[0] sdd1[2] sdc1[1]
530048 blocks [4/3] [UUU_]
bitmap: 39/65 pages [156KB], 4KB chunk

unused devices:
[~] #

[~] # fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sdd: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdd1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdd2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdd3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdd4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdc: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdc1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdc2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdc3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdc4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux
You must set cylinders.
You can do this from the extra functions menu.

Disk /dev/sdya: 0 MB, 0 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 0 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdya1 1 267350 2147483647+ ee EFI GPT
Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
phys=(0, 0, 1) logical=(0, 0, 2)
Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
phys=(1023, 254, 63) logical=(267349, 89, 4)
You must set cylinders.
You can do this from the extra functions menu.

Disk /dev/sda: 0 MB, 0 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 0 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 1 267350 2147483647+ ee EFI GPT
Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
phys=(0, 0, 1) logical=(0, 0, 2)
Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
phys=(1023, 254, 63) logical=(267349, 89, 4)

Disk /dev/sda4: 469 MB, 469893120 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 114720 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/sda4 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/sdx: 515 MB, 515899392 bytes
8 heads, 32 sectors/track, 3936 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 256 * 512 = 131072 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdx1 1 17 2160 83 Linux
/dev/sdx2 18 1910 242304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx3 1911 3803 242304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx4 3804 3936 17024 5 Extended
/dev/sdx5 3804 3868 8304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx6 3869 3936 8688 83 Linux

Disk /dev/md9: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md9 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md4: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md4 doesn’t contain a valid partition table
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sda3
/dev/sda3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : d46b73cf:b63f7efd:94338b81:55ba1b4a
Creation Time : Thu Dec 23 13:21:36 2010
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 5855836800 (5584.56 GiB 5996.38 GB)
Raid Devices : 4
Total Devices : 4
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 21:07:41 2013
State : active
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 1
Checksum : 31506936 – correct
Events : 0.7364756

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3

0 0 0 0 0 removed
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdb3
mdadm: cannot open /dev/sdb3: No such device or address
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdc3
/dev/sdc3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : d46b73cf:b63f7efd:94338b81:55ba1b4a
Creation Time : Thu Dec 23 13:21:36 2010
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 5855836800 (5584.56 GiB 5996.38 GB)
Raid Devices : 4
Total Devices : 4
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 21:07:41 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 1
Checksum : 31506959 – correct
Events : 0.7364756

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3

0 0 0 0 0 removed
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdd3
/dev/sdd3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : d46b73cf:b63f7efd:94338b81:55ba1b4a
Creation Time : Thu Dec 23 13:21:36 2010
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 5855836800 (5584.56 GiB 5996.38 GB)
Raid Devices : 4
Total Devices : 4
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 21:07:41 2013
State : active
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 1
Checksum : 3150696a – correct
Events : 0.7364756

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3

0 0 0 0 0 removed
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -D /dev/md0
mdadm: md device /dev/md0 does not appear to be active.
[~] #

[~] # cat /etc/raidtab
raiddev /dev/md0
raid-level 5
nr-raid-disks 4
nr-spare-disks 0
chunk-size 4
persistent-superblock 1
device /dev/sda3
raid-disk 0
device /dev/sdb3
raid-disk 1
device /dev/sdc3
raid-disk 2
device /dev/sdd3
raid-disk 3
[~] #

En proceso de reconstrucción de un raid 5 de 4 discos

[~] # more /proc/mdstat
Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath]
md0 : active raid5 sda3[4] sdd3[3] sdc3[2] sdb3[1]
8786092800 blocks level 5, 64k chunk, algorithm 2 [4/3] [_UUU]
[=====>……………] recovery = 26.1% (766015884/2928697600) finish=1054.1min speed=34193K/sec

md4 : active raid1 sda2[2](S) sdd2[0] sdc2[3](S) sdb2[1]
530048 blocks [2/2] [UU]

md13 : active raid1 sda4[0] sdc4[3] sdd4[2] sdb4[1]
458880 blocks [4/4] [UUUU]
bitmap: 0/57 pages [0KB], 4KB chunk

md9 : active raid1 sda1[0] sdd1[3] sdc1[2] sdb1[1]
530048 blocks [4/4] [UUUU]
bitmap: 1/65 pages [4KB], 4KB chunk

unused devices:
[~] #

~] # fdisk -l
You must set cylinders.
You can do this from the extra functions menu.

Disk /dev/sdd: 0 MB, 0 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 0 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdd1 1 267350 2147483647+ ee EFI GPT
Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
phys=(0, 0, 1) logical=(0, 0, 2)
Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
phys=(1023, 254, 63) logical=(267349, 89, 4)
You must set cylinders.
You can do this from the extra functions menu.

Disk /dev/sdc: 0 MB, 0 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 0 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdc1 1 267350 2147483647+ ee EFI GPT
Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
phys=(0, 0, 1) logical=(0, 0, 2)
Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
phys=(1023, 254, 63) logical=(267349, 89, 4)
You must set cylinders.
You can do this from the extra functions menu.

Disk /dev/sdb: 0 MB, 0 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 0 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 1 267350 2147483647+ ee EFI GPT
Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
phys=(0, 0, 1) logical=(0, 0, 2)
Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
phys=(1023, 254, 63) logical=(267349, 89, 4)

Disk /dev/sdx: 515 MB, 515899392 bytes
8 heads, 32 sectors/track, 3936 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 256 * 512 = 131072 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdx1 1 17 2160 83 Linux
/dev/sdx2 18 1910 242304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx3 1911 3803 242304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx4 3804 3936 17024 5 Extended
/dev/sdx5 3804 3868 8304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx6 3869 3936 8688 83 Linux

Disk /dev/md9: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md9 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md4: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md4 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md0: 0 MB, 0 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 0 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md0 doesn’t contain a valid partition table
You must set cylinders.
You can do this from the extra functions menu.

Disk /dev/sda: 0 MB, 0 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 0 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 1 267350 2147483647+ ee EFI GPT
Partition 1 has different physical/logical beginnings (non-Linux?):
phys=(0, 0, 1) logical=(0, 0, 2)
Partition 1 has different physical/logical endings:
phys=(1023, 254, 63) logical=(267349, 89, 4)

Disk /dev/sda4: 469 MB, 469893120 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 114720 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/sda4 doesn’t contain a valid partition table
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sda3
/dev/sda3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 9d56f3ad:0f6c7547:e7feb5d1:0092c6c8
Creation Time : Wed Dec 22 12:34:02 2010
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 2928697600 (2793.02 GiB 2998.99 GB)
Array Size : 8786092800 (8379.07 GiB 8996.96 GB)
Raid Devices : 4
Total Devices : 4
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:07:18 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 1
Checksum : 8bd3aa41 – correct
Events : 0.17507

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3

0 0 0 0 0 removed
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdb3
/dev/sdb3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 9d56f3ad:0f6c7547:e7feb5d1:0092c6c8
Creation Time : Wed Dec 22 12:34:02 2010
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 2928697600 (2793.02 GiB 2998.99 GB)
Array Size : 8786092800 (8379.07 GiB 8996.96 GB)
Raid Devices : 4
Total Devices : 4
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:18:18 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 1
Checksum : 8bd3aed1 – correct
Events : 0.17753

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3

0 0 0 0 0 removed
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdc3
/dev/sdc3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 9d56f3ad:0f6c7547:e7feb5d1:0092c6c8
Creation Time : Wed Dec 22 12:34:02 2010
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 2928697600 (2793.02 GiB 2998.99 GB)
Array Size : 8786092800 (8379.07 GiB 8996.96 GB)
Raid Devices : 4
Total Devices : 4
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:21:59 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 1
Checksum : 8bd3b060 – correct
Events : 0.17833

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3

0 0 0 0 0 removed
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdd3
/dev/sdd3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 9d56f3ad:0f6c7547:e7feb5d1:0092c6c8
Creation Time : Wed Dec 22 12:34:02 2010
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 2928697600 (2793.02 GiB 2998.99 GB)
Array Size : 8786092800 (8379.07 GiB 8996.96 GB)
Raid Devices : 4
Total Devices : 4
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:25:08 2013
State : active
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 1
Checksum : 8bd36bc9 – correct
Events : 0.17901

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3

0 0 0 0 0 removed
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 3 4 spare /dev/sda3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -D /dev/md0
/dev/md0:
Version : 00.90.03
Creation Time : Wed Dec 22 12:34:02 2010
Raid Level : raid5
Array Size : 8786092800 (8379.07 GiB 8996.96 GB)
Used Dev Size : 2928697600 (2793.02 GiB 2998.99 GB)
Raid Devices : 4
Total Devices : 4
Preferred Minor : 0
Persistence : Superblock is persistent

Update Time : Thu Jun 6 00:51:25 2013
State : clean, degraded, recovering
Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 1

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Rebuild Status : 36% complete

UUID : 9d56f3ad:0f6c7547:e7feb5d1:0092c6c8
Events : 0.20114

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
4 8 3 0 spare rebuilding /dev/sda3
1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
[~] #

[~] # cat /etc/raidtab
raiddev /dev/md0
raid-level 5
nr-raid-disks 4
nr-spare-disks 0
chunk-size 4
persistent-superblock 1
device /dev/sda3
raid-disk 0
device /dev/sdb3
raid-disk 1
device /dev/sdc3
raid-disk 2
device /dev/sdd3
raid-disk 3
[~] #

Funcionando con raid 5 de 8 discos

[~] # more /proc/mdstat
Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath]
md0 : active raid5 sda3[0] sdh3[7] sdg3[6] sdf3[5] sde3[4] sdd3[3] sdc3[2] sdb3[1]
10244987200 blocks level 5, 64k chunk, algorithm 2 [8/8] [UUUUUUUU]

md8 : active raid1 sdh2[2](S) sdg2[3](S) sdf2[4](S) sde2[5](S) sdd2[6](S) sdc2[7](S) sdb2[1] sda2[0]
530048 blocks [2/2] [UU]

md13 : active raid1 sda4[0] sdh4[7] sdg4[6] sdf4[5] sde4[4] sdd4[3] sdc4[2] sdb4[1]
458880 blocks [8/8] [UUUUUUUU]
bitmap: 0/57 pages [0KB], 4KB chunk

md9 : active raid1 sda1[0] sdh1[7] sde1[6] sdd1[5] sdg1[4] sdf1[3] sdc1[2] sdb1[1]
530048 blocks [8/8] [UUUUUUUU]
bitmap: 0/65 pages [0KB], 4KB chunk

unused devices:
[~] #

[~] # fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sde: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sde1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sde2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sde3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sde4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdf: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdf1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdf2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdf3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdf4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdg: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdg1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdg2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdg3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdg4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdh: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdh1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdh2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdh3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdh4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdc: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdc1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdc2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdc3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdc4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdb: 1500.3 GB, 1500301910016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 182401 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdb2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdb3 133 182338 1463569693 83 Linux
/dev/sdb4 182339 182400 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdd: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdd1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdd2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdd3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdd4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sda: 1500.3 GB, 1500301910016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 182401 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sda3 133 182338 1463569693 83 Linux
/dev/sda4 182339 182400 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sda4: 469 MB, 469893120 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 114720 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/sda4 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/sdx: 515 MB, 515899392 bytes
8 heads, 32 sectors/track, 3936 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 256 * 512 = 131072 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdx1 1 17 2160 83 Linux
/dev/sdx2 18 1910 242304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx3 1911 3803 242304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx4 3804 3936 17024 5 Extended
/dev/sdx5 3804 3868 8304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx6 3869 3936 8688 83 Linux

Disk /dev/md9: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md9 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md8: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md8 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md0: 10490.8 GB, 10490866892800 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, -1733720496 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md0 doesn’t contain a valid partition table
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sda3
/dev/sda3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:09:13 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : c1bb0e0b – correct
Events : 0.23432693

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdb3
/dev/sdb3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:19:22 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : c1bb107e – correct
Events : 0.23432693

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdc3
/dev/sdc3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:22:38 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : c1bb1154 – correct
Events : 0.23432693

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdd3
/dev/sdd3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:25:51 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : c1bb1227 – correct
Events : 0.23432693

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sde3
/dev/sde3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:30:42 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : c1bb135c – correct
Events : 0.23432693

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdf3
/dev/sdf3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:31:09 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : c1bb1389 – correct
Events : 0.23432693

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdg3
/dev/sdg3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:31:34 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : c1bb13b4 – correct
Events : 0.23432693

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdh3
/dev/sdh3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:31:58 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : c1bb13de – correct
Events : 0.23432693

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

~] # mdadm -D /dev/md0
/dev/md0:
Version : 00.90.03
Creation Time : Wed Mar 9 14:34:57 2011
Raid Level : raid5
Array Size : 10244987200 (9770.38 GiB 10490.87 GB)
Used Dev Size : 1463569600 (1395.77 GiB 1498.70 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0
Persistence : Superblock is persistent

Update Time : Thu Jun 6 00:52:46 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0

Layout : left-symmetric
Chunk Size : 64K

UUID : 478da556:4bba431a:8e29dce8:fdee62fd
Events : 0.23432693

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # cat /etc/raidtab
raiddev /dev/md0
raid-level 5
nr-raid-disks 8
nr-spare-disks 0
chunk-size 4
persistent-superblock 1
device /dev/sda3
raid-disk 0
device /dev/sdb3
raid-disk 1
device /dev/sdc3
raid-disk 2
device /dev/sdd3
raid-disk 3
device /dev/sde3
raid-disk 4
device /dev/sdf3
raid-disk 5
device /dev/sdg3
raid-disk 6
device /dev/sdh3
raid-disk 7
[~] #

Funcionando con raid 6 de 8 discos

[~] # more /proc/mdstat
Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath]
md0 : active raid6 sda3[0] sdh3[7] sdg3[6] sdf3[5] sde3[4] sdd3[3] sdc3[2] sdb3[1]
11711673600 blocks level 6, 64k chunk, algorithm 2 [8/8] [UUUUUUUU]

md8 : active raid1 sdh2[2](S) sdg2[3](S) sdf2[4](S) sde2[5](S) sdd2[6](S) sdc2[7](S) sdb2[1] sda2[0]
530048 blocks [2/2] [UU]

md13 : active raid1 sda4[0] sdh4[7] sdg4[6] sdf4[5] sde4[4] sdd4[3] sdc4[2] sdb4[1]
458880 blocks [8/8] [UUUUUUUU]
bitmap: 0/57 pages [0KB], 4KB chunk

md9 : active raid1 sda1[0] sdh1[7] sdf1[6] sdg1[5] sde1[4] sdd1[3] sdc1[2] sdb1[1]
530048 blocks [8/8] [UUUUUUUU]
bitmap: 3/65 pages [12KB], 4KB chunk

unused devices:
[~] #

[~] # fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sde: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sde1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sde2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sde3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sde4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdf: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdf1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdf2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdf3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdf4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdg: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdg1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdg2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdg3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdg4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdh: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdh1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdh2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdh3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdh4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdd: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdd1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdd2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdd3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdd4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdb: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdb2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdb3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdb4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sdc: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdc1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sdc2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sdc3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sdc4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sda: 2000.3 GB, 2000398934016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 243201 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 1 66 530125 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 67 132 530142 83 Linux
/dev/sda3 133 243138 1951945693 83 Linux
/dev/sda4 243139 243200 498012 83 Linux

Disk /dev/sda4: 469 MB, 469893120 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 114720 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/sda4 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/sdx: 515 MB, 515899392 bytes
8 heads, 32 sectors/track, 3936 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 256 * 512 = 131072 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdx1 1 17 2160 83 Linux
/dev/sdx2 18 1910 242304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx3 1911 3803 242304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx4 3804 3936 17024 5 Extended
/dev/sdx5 3804 3868 8304 83 Linux
/dev/sdx6 3869 3936 8688 83 Linux

Disk /dev/md9: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md9 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md8: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md8 doesn’t contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md0: 11992.7 GB, 11992753766400 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, -1367048896 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md0 doesn’t contain a valid partition table
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sda3
/dev/sda3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:10:11 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : e424ef27 – correct
Events : 0.3789835

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdb3
/dev/sdb3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:16:04 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : e424f09a – correct
Events : 0.3789835

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdc3
/dev/sdc3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:23:14 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : e424f25a – correct
Events : 0.3789835

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdd3
/dev/sdd3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:26:29 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : e424f32f – correct
Events : 0.3789835

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sde3
/dev/sde3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:33:04 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : e424f4cc – correct
Events : 0.3789835

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdf3
/dev/sdf3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:33:26 2013
State : active
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : e3eb20e9 – correct
Events : 0.3789836

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdg3
/dev/sdg3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:33:47 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : e424f51b – correct
Events : 0.3789835

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdh3
/dev/sdh3:
Magic : a92b4efc
Version : 00.90.00
UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Wed Jun 5 23:34:05 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0
Checksum : e424f53f – correct
Events : 0.3789835

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
this 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # mdadm -D /dev/md0
/dev/md0:
Version : 00.90.03
Creation Time : Wed Dec 12 04:34:21 2012
Raid Level : raid6
Array Size : 11711673600 (11169.12 GiB 11992.75 GB)
Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)
Raid Devices : 8
Total Devices : 8
Preferred Minor : 0
Persistence : Superblock is persistent

Update Time : Thu Jun 6 00:56:45 2013
State : clean
Active Devices : 8
Working Devices : 8
Failed Devices : 0
Spare Devices : 0

Chunk Size : 64K

UUID : fd2c41b5:17649ac4:1e10b251:f1136e44
Events : 0.3789835

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State
0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3
1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3
2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3
3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3
4 8 67 4 active sync /dev/sde3
5 8 83 5 active sync /dev/sdf3
6 8 99 6 active sync /dev/sdg3
7 8 115 7 active sync /dev/sdh3
[~] #

[~] # cat /etc/raidtab
raiddev /dev/md0
raid-level 6
nr-raid-disks 8
nr-spare-disks 0
chunk-size 4
persistent-superblock 1
device /dev/sda3
raid-disk 0
device /dev/sdb3
raid-disk 1
device /dev/sdc3
raid-disk 2
device /dev/sdd3
raid-disk 3
device /dev/sde3
raid-disk 4
device /dev/sdf3
raid-disk 5
device /dev/sdg3
raid-disk 6
device /dev/sdh3
raid-disk 7
[~] #

4
Jun

Parallel Desktop – No se puede comprimir el disco duro virtual

No se puede comprimir el disco duro virtual. El disco no puede comprimirse porque este es usado por una máquina virtual que está en modo seguro o discos para deshacer o bien tiene instantáneas.

APLICABLE A:

  • Parallels Desktop

Síntomas

Cuando usted intenta comprimir el disco duro de la máquina virtual, Parallels Desktop muestra uno de los siguientes mensajes de error:

“El disco no puede comprimirse porque este es usado por la máquina virtual ““, que está en modo seguro o discos para deshacer o bien tiene instantáneas”

Causa

  • El disco duro de la máquina virtual tiene instantáneas
  • La opción Discos para deshacer está activada
  • El disco duro de la máquina virtual está dañado
  • El disco duro de la máquina virtual tiene particiones ocultas o espacio no asignado

Resolución

Intente comprimir el disco duro virtual después de realizar cada uno de los pasos de resolución detallados a continuación:

1. Compruebe que el disco duro virtual no tiene ninguna Instantánea. Vaya al menú Máquina virtual > Administrar instantáneas.. y elimine todas las instantáneas. Si experimenta algún error cuando intenta eliminar las instantáneas o no se muestra ninguna instantánea, vaya a la parte Resolución avanzada de este artículo.

2. Vaya al menú Máquina virtual > Configurar… > Seguridad > desactive la opción Discos para deshacer, de estar activada.

3. Vaya al menú Máquina virtual > Configurar… > Hardware > Disco duro 1 > Editar y seleccione la opción Dividir la imagen de disco en archivos de 2 GB. Una vez realizada esta división, deseleccione la opción Dividir la imagen de disco en archivos de 2 GB

4. Si su máquina virtual se migró desde un PC real, compruebe que esta no tiene espacio no asignado. Puede comprobarlo yendo al menú Inicio de Windows > Panel de control > Herramientas administrativas > Administración de discos.

Resolución avanzada

1. En Mac OS X, vaya a Aplicaciones > Utilidades e inicie la aplicación Terminal

2. Pegue el comando que aparece a continuación al Terminal (no presione Enter de momento):

prl_disk_tool merge --hdd

2. Busque su máquina virtual en el Finder. Haga clic con el botón secundario en el archivo .pvm de su máquina virtual y seleccione Mostrar contenidos del paquete

3. Arrastre su archivo WindowsXXX.hdd al Terminal y suéltelo allí. En Terminal podrá ver algo parecido a lo siguiente:

prl_disk_tool merge --hdd /Users/Username/Documents/Parallels/Windows\ 7.pvm/Windows\ 7-0.hdd

4. Presione Enter para empezar a combinar las instantáneas. Una vez hecho esto, intente comprimir el disco duro virtual de nuevo.

Estos son los comandos que ejecuté para solucionarlo:

prl_disk_tool merge –hdd “/Users/RobertoMartinez/Parallels/Windows 7 Ultimate – ROBIT.pvm/Windows 7 Ultimate – ROBIT-0.hdd”

prl_disk_tool merge –hdd “/Users/RobertoMartinez/Parallels/Windows XP-ROBIT.pvm/Windows XP-0.hdd”

Y este comando se empleo para juntar todos los ficheros que crea vmware para dejarlo en uno (ya se que no tiene nada que vercon el tema):

/Applications/VMware\ Fusion.app/Contents/Library/vmware-vdiskmanager -r “/Users/RobertoMartinez/Documents/Virtual Machines.localized/Windows XP Orange.vmwarevm/winxporanfijo.vmdk” -t 2 single_file.vmdk

Obtenido de este enlace http://kb.parallels.com/es/9165

3
Jun

QNAP RAID Corruption / RAID System Errors

I – Introduction

II– How to Fix if RAID seems “In Degreed”

III– How to Fix if RAID seems “Unmounted”

IV – How to Fix if RAID seems Not Active (New way to fix!)

V – RAID HDD order seems wrong just like “RAID 5 – Drives : 2 4 3″and device seems Not Active

VI – How to Fix if RAID seems as “Single Disk”

VII – User Remove the RAID Volume

VIII – How to Fix if 2 HDD gives error on RAID 5, 3 HDD gives error on RAID 6

IX – Raid fail – HDDs have no partitions;

X – RAID fail – Partitions have no md superblock

XI – No md0 for array

XII – NAS fail –MountHDD(s)with another QNAP NAS

I – Introduction;

Warning : This documents are recomended for Professional users only. If you dont know what you’r doing, you may damage your RAID which cause loosing data. Qnapsupport Taiwan works great to solve this kind of RAID corruptions easly, and My advice is directly contact with them at this kind of cases.

You can download QNAP NAS Data Recovery Document Down Below:

QNAP_NAS_Data_Recovery

NAS is OK but cannot access data

raidtab is broken or missing

Check raid settings and configure right raidtab

HDD have no partitions

Use parted to recreate the partitions

•Partitions have no MD superblock

mdadm -CfR –assume-clean

•RAID array can’t be assembled or status is inactive

check above and make sure every disks on raid exist

•RAID array can’t been mounted

e2fsck, e2fsck -b

•Able to mount RAID but data is disappear

umount and e2fsck, if not work, try data recovery

•RAID is in degraded, read-only

backup the data then mdadm -CfR, it not work, recreate the RAID

NAS fail

MountHDD(s)with another QNAP NAS (System Migration)

MountHDD(s)with PC ( R-Studio/ ext3/4 reader) (3rd party tool )

Data are deleted by user/administrator accidentally

data recovery company, photorec, r-studio/r-linux

Introduction of mdadm command

#mdadm -E /dev/sda3 > that will tell if it is md disk

#mdadm -Af /dev/md0 /dev/sd[a-d]3 > that will get available md disk into raid array

———————————–

#mdadm -CfR -l5 -n8 –assume-clean /dev/md0 /dev/sd[a-h]3 > that will overwrite the mdstat on each disk

> -CfR force to create the raid array

> -l5 = raid 5array

> -n8 = available md disk

> –assume-clean without data partition syncing

Introduction of Two Scripts;

# config_util

Usage: config_util input

input=0: Check if any HD existed.

input=1: Mirror ROOT partition.

input=2: Mirror Swap Space (not yet).

input=4: Mirror RFS_EXT partition.

>> usually we have config_util 1 to get the md9 ready

# storage_boot_init

Usage: storage_boot_init phase

phase=1:mountROOTpartition.

phase=2: mount DATA partition, create storage.conf and refresh disk.

phase=3: Create_Disk_Storage_Conf.

>> usually we have storage_boot_init 1 to mount the md9

II -How to Fix if RAID seems “In Degreed”

If your RAID system seems as down below, use this document. If not, Please dont try anything in this document:

A – Qnap FAQ Advice;

Login to Qnap. Disk Managment ->Volume managment. One of your HDD should give “Read/write” or “Normal” error, or Qnap doesnt Recognize there is a HDD on on slot.

Just plug out Broken HDD, wait over 20 seconds, and plug in new HDD. If more than one HDD seems broken, dont change 2 HDD at the same time. Wait Qnap finish to Synronize first HDD, and after it completes, change other broken HDD.

If you loose more HDD than RAID HDD lost tolarance, Backup your datas quickly to another Qnap or External HDD.

Note : New HDD must be same size with your other HDDs. Qnap doesnt accept lower size new HDD. Also I dont advice to use Higher size HDD at this kind of cases. You can use another brand of HDD, or differen sata speed HDDs.

Also, If your HDD seems doesnt plugged in HDD port even if you change it with a new one, it may be an Hardware problem about Qnap sata cable or Mainboard. Send device for Repair to vendor, or open device and plug out sata cable from mainboard, then plug it back.

B – Qnap RAID Recovery Document;

RAID fail – RAID is degraded, read-only

•When degraded, read-only status, there is more disk failure than the raid can support, need to help the user to check which disks are faulty if Web UI isn’t helpful

– Check klog or dmesg to find the faulty disks

•Ask user to backup the data first

•If disks looks OK, after backup, try “mdadm -CfR –assume-clean” to recreate the RAID

•If above doesn’t work, recreate the RAID

C – My Advice;

If your system seems In Degraded, Failed Drive X, you probably loose more HDD thatn RAID tolerated, so Take your Backup, and Re-Install Qnap From Begining.

III – How to Fix if RAID Becomes “Unmounted”

If your RAID system seems as down below, fallow this document. If not, Please dont try anything in this document:

IF YOU HAVE CRİTİCAL DATA ON QNAP, PLEASE CONTACT WİTH QNAP TAIWAN SUPPORT

A – Qnap FAQ Solution;

Q : My NAS lost all its settings, and all HDDs are shown as unmounted.

A : In case of corrupt/lost config:

1. Power off the NAS. Remove the HDD(s)

2. Power on the NAS

3. After a short beep and a long beep, plug the HDD back into the NAS

4. Run QNAP Finder, it will find the NAS, do NOT configure it!

5. Connect to the NAS by telnet port 13131 (e.g. with Putty)

6. Run the MFA Degree following commands to recover with default config

Use the following commands if using 1 drive (if you have more than 1 HDD, please skip this document)

#mount /dev/sda1 /mnt

# cd /mnt/.config/

# cp /etc/default_config/uLinux.conf /mnt/.config/

# reboot

Use the following command if using 2 drives (not tested) (if you have more than 2 HDD, please skip this document)

# mdadm -A /dev/md9 /dev/sda1 /dev/sdb1

# mount /dev/md9 /mnt

# cd /mnt/.config/

# cp /etc/default_config/uLinux.conf /mnt/.config/

# reboot

8. Above procedure will reset the configuration back to default and then you need to reconfigure it. But all the share should be available now.

Please remember NOT to re-initialize the HDD. Since this will format your HDD and all your data will be lost.

9. To be prepared next time this happens, always make sure you have a working backup of your personal uLinux.conf!

Note: uLinux.conf is the main settings configuration

Taken From : Qnap FAQ

If you have 4 or more HDD, fallow this document. Dont start Qnap wihtout HDDs just like first 2 documents:

RAID fail – Cann’t be mounted, status unmount

(from Offical Qnap RAID recovery document)

1. Make sure the raid status is active (more /proc/mdstat)

2. try manually mount

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext3

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext4

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -o ro (read only)

3. use e2fsck / e2fsck_64 to check

# e2fsck -ay /dev/md0 (auto and continue with yes)

4. If there are many errors when check, memory may not enough, need to create more swap space;

Use the following command to create more swap space

[~] # more /proc/mdstat

…….

md8 : active raid1 sdh2[2](S) sdg2[3](S) sdf2[4](S) sde2[5](S) sdd2[6](S) sdc2[7](S) sdb2[1] sda2[0]

530048 blocks [2/2] [UU]

……….

[~] # swapoff /dev/md8

[~] # mdadm -S /dev/md8

mdadm: stopped /dev/md8

[~] # mkswap /dev/sda2

Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 542859 kB

no label, UUID=7194e0a9-be7a-43ac-829f-fd2d55e07d62

[~] # mkswap /dev/sdb2

Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 542859 kB

no label, UUID=0af8fcdd-8ed1-4fca-8f53-0349d86f9474

[~] # mkswap /dev/sdc2

Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 542859 kB

no label, UUID=f40bd836-3798-4c71-b8ff-9c1e9fbff6bf

[~] # mkswap /dev/sdd2

Setting up swapspace version 1, size = 542859 kB

no label, UUID=4dad1835-8d88-4cf1-a851-d80a87706fea

[~] # swapon /dev/sda2

[~] # swapon /dev/sdb2

[~] # swapon /dev/sdc2

[~] # swapon /dev/sdd2

[~] # e2fsck_64 -fy /dev/md0

If there is no file system superblock or the check fail, you can try backup superblcok.

1. Use the following command to find backup superblock location

# /usr/local/sbin/dumpe2fs /dev/md0 | grep superblock

Sample output:

Primary superblock at 0, Group descriptors at 1-6

Backup superblock at 32768, Group descriptors at 32769-32774

Backup superblock at 98304, Group descriptors at 98305-98310

..163840…229376…294912…819200…884736…1605632…2654208…4096000… 7962624… 11239424… 20480000…

23887872…71663616…78675968..102400000..214990848..512000000…550731776…644972544

2. Now check and repair a Linux file system using alternate superblock # 32768:

# e2fsck -b 32768 /dev/md0

Sample output:

fsck 1.40.2 (12-Jul-2007)

e2fsck 1.40.2 (12-Jul-2007)

/dev/sda2 was not cleanly unmounted, check forced.

Pass 1: Checking inodes, blocks, and sizescf

…….

Free blocks count wrong for group #241 (32254, counted=32253).

Fix? yes

………

/dev/sda2: ***** FILE SYSTEM WAS MODIFIED *****

/dev/sda2: 59586/30539776 files (0.6% non-contiguous), 3604682/61059048 blocks

3. Now try to mount file system using mount command:

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext4

RAID fail – able to mount but data disappear

•If the mount is OK, but data is disappear, unmount the RAID and run e2fsck again (can try backup superblock)

•If still fail, try data recovery program (photorec, R-Studio) or contact data recovery company

IV – How to Fix if RAID seems Not Active

If your RAID system seems as the picture down below, fallow this document. If not, Please dont try anything in this document:

Update your Qnap fimware with Qnapfinder 3.7.2 or higher firmware. Just go to Disk Managment -> RAID managment. Choose your RAID and press “Recover” to fix.

If this doesnt work and “Recover” button is still avaible, just fullow these steps;

While device is still working, Plug out HDD that you suspect which maybe broken, and press Recover button again.

Plug out 1.st HDD, Press Recover. If doesnt work, Plug in HDD again, and try same steps for 2.th HDD.

IF THIS DOESTN WORK, PLUG IN THESE HDD BACK AGAİN, AND PRESS RECOVER.

Now, Plug out another HDD and press “Recover” Button again.

IF THIS DOESTN WORK, PLUG IN THESE HDD BACK AGAİN, AND PRESS RECOVER.

I was able to fix my 2 costumers RAID system by whis way, without typing any linux commands.

But must warn you again, best choice is Requesting help from Qnap Taiwan Support Team.

Ofcourse, this may doesnt work. here is another case how I fix;

First, I try to fix “Recovery” method, but doesnt work. At Qnap RAID managment menu, I check All HDDs, But all of them seems good. So I Login with Putty, and type these commands;

mdadm -E /dev/sda3

mdadm -E /dev/sdb3

mdadm -E /dev/sdc3

mdadm -E /dev/sdd3

Except first HDD, other 3 HDD’s doesn have md superblock; Also I try “config_util 1” & “storage_boot_init 2” commands, but both of them gives error;

Costumer got RAID 5 (-l 5) with 4 HDD (-n 4), so ı type this command;

# mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 4 /dev/sda3 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdc3

/dev/sdd3

then mount with this command;

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext4

And works perfect.

Also here is Putty Steps;

login as: admin

admin@192.168.101.16′s password:

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sda3

/dev/sda3:

Magic : a92b4efc

Version : 00.90.00

UUID : 2d2ee77d:045a6e0f:438d81dd:575c1ff3

Creation Time : Wed Jun 6 20:11:14 2012

Raid Level : raid5

Used Dev Size : 1951945600 (1861.52 GiB 1998.79 GB)

Array Size : 5855836800 (5584.56 GiB 5996.38 GB)

Raid Devices : 4

Total Devices : 4

Preferred Minor : 0

Update Time : Fri Jan 11 10:24:40 2013

State : clean

Active Devices : 4

Working Devices : 4

Failed Devices : 0

Spare Devices : 0

Checksum : 8b330731 – correct

Events : 0.4065365

Layout : left-symmetric

Chunk Size : 64K

Number Major Minor RaidDevice State

this 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3

0 0 8 3 0 active sync /dev/sda3

1 1 8 19 1 active sync /dev/sdb3

2 2 8 35 2 active sync /dev/sdc3

3 3 8 51 3 active sync /dev/sdd3

[~] # mdadm -E /dev/sdb3

mdadm: No md superblock detected on /dev/sdb3.

[~] # mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 4 /dev/sda3 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdc3 /dev/sdd3

mdadm: /dev/sda3 appears to contain an ext2fs file system

size=1560869504K mtime=Fri Jan 11 10:22:54 2013

mdadm: /dev/sda3 appears to be part of a raid array:

level=raid5 devices=4 ctime=Wed Jun 6 20:11:14 2012

mdadm: /dev/sdd3 appears to contain an ext2fs file system

size=1292434048K mtime=Fri Jan 11 10:22:54 2013

mdadm: array /dev/md0 started.

[~] # more /proc/mdstat

Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath]

md0 : active raid5 sdd3[3] sdc3[2] sdb3[1] sda3[0]

5855836800 blocks level 5, 64k chunk, algorithm 2 [4/4] [UUUU]

md4 : active raid1 sda2[2](S) sdd2[0] sdc2[3](S) sdb2[1]

530048 blocks [2/2] [UU]

md13 : active raid1 sda4[0] sdc4[3] sdd4[2] sdb4[1]

458880 blocks [4/4] [UUUU]

bitmap: 0/57 pages [0KB], 4KB chunk

md9 : active raid1 sda1[0] sdc1[3] sdd1[2] sdb1[1]

530048 blocks [4/4] [UUUU]

bitmap: 1/65 pages [4KB], 4KB chunk

unused devices:

[~] # mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext4

[~] #

Here is Result;

Qnap Taiwan Advice:

IF YOU HAVE CRİTİCAL DATA ON QNAP, PLEASE CONTACT WİTH QNAP TAIWAN SUPPORT

RAID fail – RAID can’t be assembled or status is inactive:

1.Check partitions, md superblock status

2.Check if there is any RAID disk missing / faulty

3. Use “mdadm -CfR –assume-clean” to recreate the RAID

V – RAID HDD order seems wrong just like “RAID 5 – Drives : 2 4 3″and device seems Not Active

If your RAID order seems like this:

First try RAID recovery. İf its still failes:

Follow this document:

Download Winscp and Login to your Qnap. Go to etc -> raidtab and first take bakup of this file!

Then double click on this file. At this table, sda means your first HDD, sdb is your second and sdc means your 3.th HDD, and their order seems wrong.

Right table should be like down below so modify RAID like this:

RAID-5

raiddev /dev/md0

raid-level 5

nr-raid-disks 3

nr-spare-disks 0

chunk-size 4

persistent-superblock 1

device /dev/sda3

raid-disk 0

device /dev/sdb3

raid-disk 1

device /dev/sdc3

raid-disk 2

At this case I have 4 HDD, so modify nr-raid-disks 4 and also add this line :

device /dev/sdd3

raid-disk 3

It should be look like this:

Now, save this file, and restart your Qnap.

VI – “How to Fix” if all of your HDDs seems as “Single Disk” even you have a RAID structure or accedently RAID Removed;

I Highly Recomanded you to contact with Qnap SupportTaiwan, but I you know what you are doing, here is how to fix document;

RAID Issue – raidtab is broken

•raidtab is used to check if the disk is in RAID group or single and show the RAID information on web UI.

•If the disk is in RAID but Web UI show it is single, or the RAID information is different to the actual disk RAID data ( checked by mdadm -E), then the raidtab should be corrupt. Then you need to manually edit the raidtab file to comply the actual RAID status.

•Check the following slides for raidtab contents

Single

No raidtab

RAID 0 Stripping

raiddev /dev/md0

raid-level 0

nr-raid-disks 2

nr-spare-disks 0

chunk-size 4

persistent-superblock 1

device /dev/sda3

raid-disk 0

device /dev/sdb3

raid-disk 1

RAID-1 Mirror

raiddev /dev/md0

raid-level 1

nr-raid-disks 2

nr-spare-disks 0

chunk-size 4

persistent-superblock 1

device /dev/sda3

raid-disk 0

device /dev/sdb3

raid-disk 1

JBOD Linear

raiddev /dev/md0

raid-level linear

nr-raid-disks 3

nr-spare-disks 0

chunk-size 4

persistent-superblock 1

device /dev/sda3

raid-disk 0

device /dev/sdb3

raid-disk 1

device /dev/sdc3

raid-disk 2

RAID-5

raiddev /dev/md0

raid-level 5

nr-raid-disks 3

nr-spare-disks 0

chunk-size 4

persistent-superblock 1

device /dev/sda3

raid-disk 0

device /dev/sdb3

raid-disk 1

device /dev/sdc3

raid-disk 2

RAID-5 + Hot spare

raiddev /dev/md0

raid-level 5

nr-raid-disks 3

nr-spare-disks 1

chunk-size 4

persistent-superblock 1

device /dev/sda3

raid-disk 0

device /dev/sdb3

raid-disk 1

device /dev/sdc3

raid-disk 2

device /dev/sdd3

spare-disk 0

RAID-5 + Global Spare

raidtab is same as RAID-5

On uLinux.conf, add a line if global spare disk is disk 4:

[Storage]

GLOBAL_SPARE_DRIVE_4 = TRUE

RAID-6

raiddev /dev/md0

raid-level 6

nr-raid-disks 4

nr-spare-disks 0

chunk-size 4

persistent-superblock 1

device /dev/sda3

raid-disk 0

device /dev/sdb3

raid-disk 1

device /dev/sdc3

raid-disk 2

device /dev/sdd3

raid-disk 3

RAID-10

raiddev /dev/md0

raid-level 10

nr-raid-disks 4

nr-spare-disks 0

chunk-size 4

persistent-superblock 1

device /dev/sda3

raid-disk 0

device /dev/sdb3

raid-disk 1

device /dev/sdc3

raid-disk 2

device /dev/sdd3

raid-disk 3

VII – User Remove the RAID Volume

# more /proc/mdstat

**Check if the RAID is really removed

# mdadm -E /dev/sda3

** Check if the MD superblock is really removed

# mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 3 /dev/sda3 /dev/sdb3 /dev/sdc3

**Create the RAID, assume it is 3 HDDs raid-5

# e2fsck -y /dev/md0

**check file system, Assume “yes” to all questions. If 64-bit, e2fsck_64

# mount /dev/md0 /share/MD0_DATA -t ext4

** mount the RAID back

# vi raidtab

** manually create the raid table

# reboot

** Need to add the removed network share(s) back after reboot

VIII – How to Fix if 2 HDD gives error on RAID 5, 3 HDD gives error on RAID 6

If you cant reach your datas on Qnap, Plug HDDs to another Qnap (I save my 2 costumer all of datas by this way before)

If you can reach your datas, Quickly Backup your datas to another Qnap or External Drive. After it completes, Install Qnap RAID System again.

IX – Raid fail – HDDs have no partitions;

When use the following commands to check the HDD, there is no partition or only one partition.

# parted /dev/sdx print

The following is sample.

# blkid ** this command show all partitions on the NAS

Note: fdisk -l cannot show correct partition table for 3TB HDDs

The following tool (x86 only) can help us to calculate correct partition size according to the HDD size. Please save it in your NAS (x86 model) and make sure the file size is 10,086 bytes.

ftp://csdread:csdread@ftp.qnap.com/NAS/utility/Create_Partitions

1. Get every disk size:

# cat /sys/block/sda/size

625142448

2. Get the disk partition list. It should contain 4 partitions if normal;

# parted /dev/sda print

Model: Seagate ST3320620AS (scsi)

Disk /dev/sda: 320GB

Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B

Partition Table: msdos

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags

1 32.3kB 543MB 543MB primary ext3 boot

2 543MB 1086MB 543MB primary linux-swap(v1)

3 1086MB 320GB 318GB primary ext3

4 320GB 320GB 510MB primary ext3

3. Run the tool in your NAS to get the recover commands:

# Create_Partitions /dev/sda 625142448

/dev/sda size 305245

disk_size=625142448

/usr/sbin/parted /dev/sda -s mkpart primary 40s 1060289s

/usr/sbin/parted /dev/sda -s mkpart primary 1060296s 2120579s

/usr/sbin/parted /dev/sda -s mkpart primary 2120584s 624125249s

/usr/sbin/parted /dev/sda -s mkpart primary 624125256s 625121279s

If the disk contains none partition, run the 4 commands.

If the disk contains only 1 partition, run the last 3 commands.

If the disk contains only 2 partition, run the last 2 commands.

If the disk contains only 3 partition, run the last 1 commands.

4. Check the disk partition after recover. And it should contain 4 partitions now.

# parted /dev/sda print

Model: Seagate ST3320620AS (scsi)

Disk /dev/sda: 320GB

Sector size (logical/physical): 512B/512B

Partition Table: msdos

Number Start End Size Type File system Flags

1 32.3kB 543MB 543MB primary ext3 boot

2 543MB 1086MB 543MB primary linux-swap(v1)

3 1086MB 320GB 318GB primary ext3

4 320GB 320GB 510MB primary ext3

5. Please then run “sync” or reboot the NAS for the new partition to take effect.

X – RAID fail – Partitions have no md superblock

•If one or all HDD partitions are lost, or the partitions have no md superblock for unknown reason, use the mdadm -CfR command to recreate the RAID.

# mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 4 /dev/sda3…

Note:

1.Make sure the disk is in correct sequence. Use “mdadm -E” or check raidtab to confirm

2.If one of the disk is missing or have problem, replace the disk with “missing”.

For example:

# mdadm -CfR –assume-clean /dev/md0 -l 5 -n 4 /dev/sda3 missing /dev/sdc3 /dev/sdd3

XI – No md0 for array

manually create the md0 with mdadm -CfR

XII – NAS fail – Mount HDD(s) with another QNAP NAS

•User can plug the HDD(s) to another same model name NAS to access the data

•User can plug the HDD(s) to other model name NAS to access the data by perform system migration

http://docs.qnap.com/nas/en/index.html?system_migration.htm

note: TS-101/201/109/209/409/409U series doesn’t support system migration

•Since the firmware is also stored on the HDD(s), its firmware version may be different to the firmware on NAS. Firmware upgrade may be required required after above operation

Obtained from this link

2
Jun

Maximum request length exceeded

If you are using IIS for hosting your application, then the default upload file size if 4MB. To increase it, please use this below section in your web.config –

<configuration>
    <system.web>
        <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" />
    </system.web>
</configuration>

Just to add – If you are using IIS7 then you need to use below lines instead of above –

 <system.webServer>
   <security>
      <requestFiltering>
         <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1048576000" />
      </requestFiltering>
   </security>
 </system.webServer>

Note: maxAllowedContentLength is measured in bytes while maxRequestLength is measured in kilobytes, which is why the values differ in this config example.

I don’t think it’s been mentioned here, but to get this working, I had to supply both of these values in the web.config:

In system.web

<httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" executionTimeout="3600" />

And in system.webServer

<security>
    <requestFiltering>
        <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824" />
    </requestFiltering>
</security>

IMPORTANT: Both of these values must match. In this case, my max upload is 1024 megabytes.

maxRequestLength has 1048576 KILOBYTES, and maxAllowedContentLength has 1073741824 BYTES.

I know it’s obvious, but it’s easy to overlook.

It may be worth noting that you may want to limit this change to the URL you expect to be used for the upload rather then your entire site.

<location path="Documents/Upload">
  <system.web>
    <!-- 50MB in kilobytes, default is 4096 or 4MB-->
    <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="51200" />
  </system.web>
  <system.webServer>
    <security>
      <requestFiltering>
        <!-- 50MB in bytes, default is 30000000 or approx. 28.6102 Mb-->
        <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="52428800" /> 
      </requestFiltering>
    </security>
  </system.webServer>
</location>
1
Jun

Changing the maximum upload size for IIS 7.5

I hit a snag when uploading large files using PHP on IIS 7.5. I was getting some weird Error 404, which in most cases means the PHP script that handles the upload process was not found. I checked my server, and sure enough, the PHP script was there. I tried again to be sure, this time with a smaller file. And what do you know, it worked just fine.

This led me to believe that there was a file size restriction imposed somewhere. I’ve already modified the php.ini file to allow me to upload larger files, but still no go. So the only other thing I can think of was IIS. Apache has something like that, so it’s only obvious that the ever-so-cautious IIS would be the same.

After much research, and a couple of Google searches later, I found a simple solution involving some simple config file edits. Damn, after working with IIS for the past 6 months, I got used to not having to deal with config files. Anyway, the file you want to modify is “C:\Windows\System32\inetsrv\config\applicationHost.config”. I don’t know if it makes any difference, but I’ve converted the folders that hold my PHP scripts into Applications through the IIS Manager.

So open that file up using any text editor. It was a newly installed virtual server, so I didn’t have anything other than Notepad available.

Add the following lines to the bottom of the file, making sure it’s inside the area.


Where “Default Web Site” is the name of your website, “alnet” is the name of the application, and “2147483648″ is the amount you want to set for the upload file limit in bytes. So as you can see, I’ve set my IIS to accept file sizes up to 2GB. You can add as many of this as you need. I have 3 applications, so I have three of these in my config XML script. You can also use the following line at a command prompt. Be sure to navigate to “C:\Windows\System32\inetsrv” first.

appcmd set config "Default Web Site/alnet" -section:requestFiltering
-requestLimits.maxAllowedContentLength:2147483648-commitpath:apphost

Where “Default Web Site” is your website and “alnet” is the name of your application.

That’s it. Have fun and if you know of a better way to achieve the same result, let me know using the comment form.

Until next time, Wassalam.

EDIT:

An easier way to go about this, as I’ve recently discovered, is to use the IIS Manager. I know, I know. This is by far the best way to go about this, but I don’t really have that much experience with Windows Server and I’m so used to the Linux way of editing configuration files that I didn’t think to use the IIS Manager for this. Anyway, here’s how to change the file upload limit using the IIS Manager.

Open up the Server Manager and navigate to the IIS Manager. Click on your Application icon and turn your attention to the center window. Scroll down to the bottom and you will find the Configuration Editor under Management. Double-click on this and you will be presented with a bunch of settings.

Open up the drop down menu and navigate through the following; system.webServer > security > requestFiltering. Click on that and it will show you the current requestFiltering settings for your Application. Scroll down and until you find requestLimits. Expand it and there you should see maxAllowedContentLength. You can now change this value to any value you wish to set. Once you’re done, click Apply and that’s it.

Here’s a picture showing you where and what to change. At this moment, I only have the Japanese version of Windows Server available to take screenshots from, but I’m sure you get the idea.

Obtained from this link

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